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Three Things to Know about Australia’s Ute

truck fleet
Australia is known for many things: the Great Barrier Reef, the casual Aussie accent, kangaroos and koalas, surfs and beaches, and a more laid-back lifestyle.

When it comes to vehicles, nothing spells Land Down Under more than the utility coupes.

To help you appreciate and understand the ute culture in Australia, here are three important things to know about the vehicle:

1. Utes Are Not Pickup Trucks – Technically

The quintessential vehicle features two doors and a cargo tray. It is popular in the rural areas where it serves several purposes, including delivering goods during the weekdays and carrying camping gear during the holidays.
Over the years, however, the term has been used interchangeably with ’pickup’.

Perhaps it is because of the increased demand and patronage for supersized American pickup trucks. They can also survive the diverse road conditions and landscapes of the country. Technically, pickup trucks are different from the Australian utes since they do not have integrated cargo trays.

2. South Australia Does Not Classify Classic Utes as Heavy Vehicles

In South Australia, the category for heavy vehicles includes B-doubles, road trains, trucks, agricultural machinery, tankers, delivery trucks and other vehicles that are long and are slow-moving when on the road. MFI Service Bodies, for example, uses heavy-duty vehicles for their commercial and recreational fleet services.

Licences given to the owners are dependent on the vehicle class: light rigid or medium rigid, heavy rigid or heavy combination, and multi-combination.

3. It Is Normal to Customise Utes

Since utes are not only a necessity but also a bragging right, most owners spend money on customising their design. Some of the popular additions include bullbars, spotlights and mudflaps. You can also customise commercial ladder racks in Australia.

Despite the influx of more foreign heavy-duty vehicles, the utes are here to stay. Their multipurpose use serves Australians in ways that other service vehicles can’t. Trucks may evolve, but utes will never go away.

February 1, 2017 at 1:00 amThe Marketing Section

Why Outsourcing Tank Repair Services is Good for Your Business

tank repair
For businesses that use industrial storage tanks, the quality and condition of the tanks are of utmost importance. Whether you use a tank to store water or chemicals, any damages or problems may affect the entire business operation.

Instead of finding the problems yourself and going for a quick DIY fix, you must set a specific portion of your budget for maintenance and repair. Here’s why.

It saves you time

Imagine how inconvenient and time-consuming it is to trace the cause of a leak and do the repairs yourself. Even if you have an in-house tank maintenance team, you can’t deny the fact that hiring professionals is a practical choice. You can focus on other aspects of your business while allowing certified repair technicians to fix problems with your industrial tank.

It helps you stay compliant

The Government has set standards regarding the manufacturing, use, and maintenance of industrial tanks. When hiring repair technicians, it’s best to check their qualifications and see if they comply with API 653 specifications. Doing so ensures you’re getting the highest quality of service and workmanship to bring your storage tank back to its normal working condition.

It reduces downtime

Halting your operations due to a faulty or leaky tank is one of the worst things that could happen in your facility. Don’t let this untoward incident ruin your production schedules and reputation. You can reduce downtime by calling the experts immediately. Some companies provide a quick response and turnaround time, allowing you to resume operations as soon as possible.

Time is money and you can’t afford to put important tasks on hold when your storage tank fails. Your backup plan should include maintaining an updated list of installation or repair contractors and their contact numbers. Having an extra tank or two will also help you accomplish things while waiting for your main tank to be available and operational.

January 25, 2017 at 7:15 amProduct Review

Tank Design That Stand Out Under the API 650

Storage TanksHave you seen those tanks used in non-refrigerated service? How about those tanks that are well-supported in the bottom? Those tanks are based on the API 650 design by the American Petroleum Institute (or API). 

Here are some facts about the design of API 650 tanks:

  1. Their main advantage is they come in almost any size, making them ideal for storing chemicals, gas, biofuel, oil, and water. Thanks to this, they are among the oil industry’s most commonly used tanks.
  2. Their design uses two units (systems). One is the SI Units (or the International Standard) and the other is the US Customary Units.
  3. They are made with special considerations as a basis. Their design gives allowance for corrosion. The API 650 tanks’ main foundation should also have tolerance for the levelness of secondary foundations.
  4. Different designs for their roofing system are allowed. Some of the common roof designs are dome, umbrella, and fixed roof. You can also find that their roofing systems give support to the plates and the whole structure.
  5. The main material used for construction should be chosen carefully. Particularly, the metal should be capable of lasting well in rough temperatures. They should not be easily destroyed upon exposure to temperatures around 15 degrees Fahrenheit.
  6. The API follows a foot by foot method for the measurements of standard tank sizes. As this method says, API 650 tank designs should have an estimated total weight (empty tank) of 354,980 lbs.
  7. They can last well in conditions with high temperatures and low pressure. They can store content in an environment of 40F up to 500F. They can also store contents at lower pressure (2 1/2 PSI max).

If you compare them to others, storage tanks under API 650 stand out. They are highly functional, and they offer lots of advantages.

January 18, 2017 at 9:25 amStudy Section