Post Tagged with: "cleaning"

Recommended Measures For Chemical Spill Cleanup

Barrels of toxic chemicalsWhen it comes to simple spills, one doesn’t have to always call for emergency responders. Just don’t forget to notify the safety officer responsible for your facility.

If you have the right chemical spill kits and other protective equipment on hand, you can easily do the cleaning by yourself. Here are the recommended procedures for handling and cleaning simple spills.

Neutralise bases and acids

The neutralisation process can sometimes be vigorous, often involving large amounts of heat and splashes, but once done, cleaning up the spill would be easy. Neutralise bases with ascorbic or citric acid, and use sodium bicarbonate or soda ash for acids. Get a pH paper to determine when the spill has been neutralised. Mop the spill and rinse it down to your sanitary sewage drain.

Gather and contain the residues

Sweep, scoop, or place any of the cleanup residues into a container. Be sure to enclose dry powders with plastic bags. Additional wrapping may be necessary before the wastes can be transported out of your laboratory.

Stop the spread of vapours and dust

Close the laboratory door immediately if you are handling volatile substances that can produce airborne dust. Use fume hoods to prevent the spread of vapours and dust to other zones, as well as improve air circulation.

Sanitise the area

Use a fan or open your windows to ventilate the space. You might want to ask your environmental health and safety officer to examine the air to guarantee that no harmful vapour is present in the area. In some instances, conventional cleaning products can already provide adequate sanitisation. It is safer to have a pre-arranged kit ready, so you can easily control the spill.

When working with chemicals, it pays to be prepared for spills and have everything you need in one place. This way, you will know which equipment to use and how to handle the situation properly.

November 24, 2017 at 10:39 pmStudy Section